Up-and-coming PR practitioners: Learn Tech

When we think about the technology revolution, we think about Bill Gates’ vision of a computer in every home. But the revolution extends far beyond that; technology has so radically changed business that David Kirkpatrick believes that every company is a software company. Beyond that, technology has changed the way that businesses can impact society for good.

Areas in technology such as Big Data, SaaS and and Information Technology may not have the same appeal as consumer tech, but the need for good PR in these areas are just as big. Up-and-coming PR practitioners need to understand these areas because these areas are becoming less about technology and more about life.

As the lines become more blurred, the stories we tell our audiences become less “tech” and more “human.” We stop talking about what the cloud is and start talking about how companies such as MobileWorks¬†are increasing the accessibility of technology to low-income households. We stop talking about the amount of data we can store and access remotely and start talking about how doctors are using ¬†information from other hospitals to save people’s lives. These stories are not “technical” stories; they’re human interest stories that have appeal to everyone. As practitioners, we need to be able to know tech well enough to tell these stories to our audiences.

How to Start Over [Career]

Your career is in shambles. You have no money. You’re living with your parents. Where do you go?

Step 1: Make a plan

Head to a coffee shop and write out the steps you need to take to be successful. Too broke for a coffee shop? Brew a pot at home and write out how to get where you want to go. You need a plan for when depression hits. Plus, a plan will make you feel a lot better.

Step 2: Perform Step 1 of your plan

It sounds simple, right? But it’s strange how procrastination, depression or other external factors can get in the way of starting over. Build up your courage, psyche yourself up, kick yourself out the front door; whatever you have to do, make sure you do perform the first action item on your plan. You’ll be surprised the amount of confidence you gain from making the first step.

Step 3: Create a side-goal

Odds are that your plan will take some time to come to fruition. So set a side goal that will fill the time between steps. Finish a book, set a fitness goal, or make it a priority to finish your spring cleaning. Don’t let yourself mope about where you’re not, and don’t let yourself daydream about the future too much.

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